NURS FPX4040 Assessment 3 Annotated Bibliography on Technology in Nursing AW

NURS FPX4040 Assessment 3 Annotated Bibliography on Technology in Nursing AW

Annotated Bibliography on Technology in Nursing – Pulse Oximetry 

NURS FPX4040 Assessment 3 Annotated Bibliography on Technology in Nursing AW

Pulse oximeters are a type of direct patient care equipment that provides a semi measurement of arterial erythrocyte oxygen saturation. One of the most frequent ways of determining the percentage of oxygen levels in the blood is pulse oximetry (Mahant et al., 2021). Pulse oximeters are useful in case of complications because they can identify low oxygen levels. Healthcare practitioners use pulse oximeters in restoration, cases of emergencies, and adolescent units, as well as operating rooms and maternity wards (Mahant, et al., 2021). This annotated bibliography discusses how pulse oximeters are utilized, as well as their restrictions and validity, and also patient experience. I collected my information from many research-based websites such as PubMed, CINAHL, and NCBI. I used the last five years’ filter and the most recently published articles. Furthermore, I have used Pulse oximeters, oxygen saturation, hemolytic anemia, oxyhemoglobin, SaO2 and SpO2 as a keyword in my research.

Annotated Bibliography 

Current Evidence on the Patient Care Technology

Mahant, S., Wahi, G., Bayliss, A., Giglia, L., Kanani, R., Pound, C. M., Sakran, M., Kozlowski, N., Breen-Reid, K., Arafeh, D., Moretti, M. E., Agarwal, A., Barrowman, N., Willan, A. R., Schuh, S., Parkin, P. C., & Canadian Paediatric Inpatient Research Network (PIRN) (2021). Intermittent vs Continuous Pulse Oximetry in hospitalized infants with stabilized Bronchiolitis: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Pediatrics175(5), 466–474. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.6141

Pulse oximetry in outpatient clinics is discussed in this article. According to the authors, hospitals in the United States treat a couple of children with bronchiectasis and other breathing problems annually. A pulse oximeter, a tool that detects the consumption of oxygen in the body, is commonly used to monitor these issues. Medical workers utilize oxygen levels to assess a patient’s cardiopulmonary state, and they are one of the main considerations in a patient’s release. Pulse oximetry is commonly utilized in adolescents (hospital intensive care units and children’s wards) as well as operating rooms. During respiratory therapy, pulse ongoing monitoring is being used to measure blood oxygen, estimate circulation, detect intrapleural pressure paradoxes, and screen newborns for congenital anomalies. Though the article does not go into detail on why the restrictions exist, it does point out a few instances where pulse oximeters are misleading. Due to insufficient information, pulse oximeters have some drawbacks. Hypertension, intense external light, complexion, nail paint, inadequate circulation, and intramuscular angiography all-cause insufficient responses. In circumstances of arterial stimulation, such as significant aortic stenosis, atrioventricular insufficiency, and blood pressure monitors or splints above the pulse oximeter site, pulse oximeters indicate low readings. Because of the nonlinear structure of the arterial oxygen dissociation curve, pulse oximeters may miss hypovolemia in individuals with high increased oxygen pressure. In cases of hemolytic anemia, pulse oximeters also generate incorrect values. The source points out a few drawbacks, which will help readers use heartbeat oximeters with prudence. Considering these drawbacks, pulse ongoing monitoring is suggested for use in pediatricians since they are portable and allows for direct measurement of arterial pressure. 

Integrates Evidence of Patient Care 

Evans, L., Rhodes, A., Alhazzani, W., Antonelli, M., Coopersmith, C. M., French, C., Machado, F. R., Mcintyre, L., Ostermann, M., Prescott, H. C., Schorr, C., Simpson, S., Wiersinga, W. J., Alshamsi, F., Angus, D. C., Arabi, Y., Azevedo, L., Beale, R., Beilman, G., Belley-Cote, E., … Levy, M. (2021). Surviving sepsis campaign: international guidelines for management of sepsis and septic shock 2021. Intensive Care Medicine47(11), 1181–1247. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00134-021-06506-y

NURS FPX4040 Assessment 3 Annotated Bibliography on Technology in Nursing AW

The concepts, reliability, functionality, and consequence of pulse oximeters are discussed in this article. It goes over the benefits of imaging modality of choice pulse oximeters over standard pulse oximeters. Traditional pulse oximeters assume that cytoglobins such as oxidative metabolism and methemoglobin are absent because they can only discriminate between hemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin, but high spectral pulse oximeters can estimate the blood levels of myoglobin and methemoglobin. As a result, for more precise readings, clinicians prefer to implement organelle found in most eukaryotic pulse oximeters. The rate of transfer from a post-operative care level to the intensive care unit (ICU) is a significant element in determining the utilization of pulse oximeters in hospital settings. The resource discusses a study by Evans et al. in which patients should be examined with pulse oximeters either regularly (blood glucose meter category) or occasionally (intermittent group) depending on patient requirements as determined by a doctor or a caregiver (control group). The oximeter group had a lower rate of ICU transfers for respiratory problems than the control group. Furthermore, even though the patients in the oximeter group were older and had more comorbidity, the projected cost of treatment from recruitment to the end of the trial was cheaper for the oximeter team than for the comparison group. The early diagnosis and management of postoperative pulmonary problems in the oximeter group were thought to be the reason for the lower number of bronchial discharges to the ICU. However, anesthesiologists thought pulse oximetry was quite useful in guiding patient care. Pulse oximeters are recommended by health workers because they believe that keeping oxygen saturation within safe levels can help prevent permanent harm. As a result, pulse oximetry is a useful tool.

Organizational Factors Influencing the Use of Technology 

Plana, M. N., Zamora, J., Suresh, G., Fernandez-Pineda, L., Thangaratinam, S., & Ewer, A. K. (2018). Pulse oximetry screening for critical congenital heart defects. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews3(3), CD011912. https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD011912.pub2

NURS FPX4040 Assessment 3 Annotated Bibliography on Technology in Nursing AW

This article explains how pulse oximetry is being used to check for significant genetic heart abnormalities around the world. Pulse oximetry is widely recommended for Critical Congenital Heart Defects (CCHD) screening since it is useful, rapid, simple, and cost-efficient. According to the authors, pulse oximetry screening can be strengthened by educating parents and guardians and employing computer-based methods. Pulse oximetry aids in the detection of substantial disease and is a trustworthy tool for monitoring CCHD, which necessitates ongoing assessment and prompt medical care. Pulse oximeters identify therapeutically undetectable hypoxemia in practically every toddler with CCHD. Early studies of infant pulse oximetry screening for congenital heart disease CCHD revealed reliable data. As a result, the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services suggested that CCHD testing be included in the common testing panel. Pulse oximetry screening has an accuracy of almost a hundred percent, and responsiveness of seventy-six percent, according to a meta-analysis of 13 screening trials. As a result, the researchers concluded that pulse oximetry screening met the standardized assessment requirements. Pre-ductal and post-ductal pulse oximetry tests demonstrate no change in performance in pulse oximetry screening. Pulse oximetry screening 24 hours after birth increases the chance of misdiagnosis of CCHD in babies but lowers the true alarm rate. As a consequence, pulse oximeters can be effective in predicting CCHD early on, lowering morbidity, and improving success rates. 

Implementation and Use of Technology

Gürün Kaya, A., Öz, M., Akdemir Kalkan, İ., Gülten, E., Çınar, G., Azap, A., & Kaya, A. (2021). Is pulse oximeter a reliable tool for non-critically ill patients with COVID-19? International Journal of Clinical Practice75(12), e14983. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijcp.14983

This study provides a thorough understanding of how pulse oximetry works, emphasizing the monitoring systems used, their drawbacks, and the level of precision that may be expected when calculating blood oxygen. The percentage of oxygen in the blood is measured by blood oxygen (SaO2). Pulse oximeters detect a considerable drop in oxygen in a patient’s cardiac activity. Pulse oximeters’ (SpO2) measurements of oxygen saturation are frequently erroneous. Supplemental oxygen is given to six critically ill patients.

NURS FPX4040 Assessment 3 Annotated Bibliography on Technology in Nursing AW

The accuracy of a pulse oximeter is determined by the difference between SpO2 and SaO2. Even though pulse oximetry’s accuracy in detecting SaO2 in sick patients is 3–4%, it can promptly detect an abrupt reduction in SpO2 in sedated patients and patients in intensive care units. Considering the problems of pulse oximetry, the SpO2 assessment of the respondents from the device is regarded as accurate for detecting respiratory function impairment. Pulse oximetry also has the benefit of being a painless method of measuring oxygen saturation. Because of the infants’ sensitivity to retinal immaturity, which is caused by a high level of oxygen in red cells, studies suggest that pulse oximetry should not be the main way of monitoring SaO2 in the maternity ward. The author concludes that developments in pulse oximeter technology have improved their ability to treat and coordinate care. 

Conclusion

It is concluded that Pulse oximeters are recommended for monitoring oxygen saturation levels in patients with respiratory disorders, notwithstanding their limitations. Pulse oximeters serve to reduce the number of pulmonary transfers from the neurosurgical ward to the intensive care unit. Pulse oximeters are highly recommended in general hospitals since they play such an important role in screening infants for CCHD. Pulse oximetry aids in the early diagnosis of some diseases, averting permanent organ damage and lowering fatality rates. In hospitals, pulse oximeters are a premium resource. They can immediately identify a large drop in oxygen in a patient’s pulmonary function. Patients who were continuously watched with pulse oximeters had a lower rate of transfers to the critical care unit due to respiratory problems than patients who were observed occasionally with pulse oximeters.

References

Evans, L., Rhodes, A., Alhazzani, W., Antonelli, M., Coopersmith, C. M., French, C., Machado, F. R., Mcintyre, L., Ostermann, M., Prescott, H. C., Schorr, C., Simpson, S., Wiersinga, W. J., Alshamsi, F., Angus, D. C., Arabi, Y., Azevedo, L., Beale, R., Beilman, G., Belley-Cote, E., … Levy, M. (2021). Surviving sepsis campaign: international guidelines for management of sepsis and septic shock 2021. Intensive Care Medicine47(11), 1181–1247. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00134-021-06506-y

Gürün Kaya, A., Öz, M., Akdemir Kalkan, İ., Gülten, E., Çınar, G., Azap, A., & Kaya, A. (2021). Is pulse oximeter a reliable tool for non-critically ill patients with COVID-19? International Journal of Clinical Practice75(12), e14983. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijcp.14983

NURS FPX4040 Assessment 3 Annotated Bibliography on Technology in Nursing AW

Mahant, S., Wahi, G., Bayliss, A., Giglia, L., Kanani, R., Pound, C. M., Sakran, M., Kozlowski, N., Breen-Reid, K., Arafeh, D., Moretti, M. E., Agarwal, A., Barrowman, N., Willan, A. R., Schuh, S., Parkin, P. C., & Canadian Paediatric Inpatient Research Network (PIRN) (2021). Intermittent vs Continuous Pulse Oximetry in hospitalized infants with stabilized Bronchiolitis: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Pediatrics175(5), 466–474. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.6141 

Plana, M. N., Zamora, J., Suresh, G., Fernandez-Pineda, L., Thangaratinam, S., & Ewer, A. K. (2018). Pulse oximetry screening for critical congenital heart defects. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews3(3), CD011912. https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD011912.pub2

Don't have time to write? Get Free Quote

    Get Unlimited Access to all Papers

    You get full access to all sample papers.