NURS FPX 4900 Assessment 1 Assessing the Problem: Leadership Collaboration Communication Change Management and Policy Considerations SC

NURS FPX 4900 Assessment 1 Assessing the Problem: Leadership Collaboration Communication Change Management and Policy Considerations SC

Assessing the Problem: Leadership, Collaboration, Communication, Change Management, and Policy Considerations

Selecting the Patient

 As a baccalaureate-prepared nurse, my responsibility is beyond helping patients in the hospital or healthcare settings, the utmost goal of baccalaureate-prepared nurses is to improve patient’s wellbeing and identify problems and complex healthcare issues to enhance outcomes. Karla is a 47-year-old female patient who has been suffering from diabetes disease for over 12 years; due to her excessive body fat and weight, she has also experienced heart-related issues in the recent years. In this interview session with Karla, a two-hour practicum at Prime Hospital, United States aims to discover the condition of Karla’s health. Keeping in mind her chronic diabetic history as well as her living choices, the practicum involved doing a one-on-one interview with Karla with type 2 diabetes (López‐Medina, 2021). 

Karla showed up in our Prime Hospital one month ago when she felt a problem due to severe symptoms of dizziness and headaches. This resulted in an increase in urine release and also showed chest pain symptoms in the patient. As a result of diabetes and other physical problems, Karla was also facing psychological issues such as depression and anxiety. However, the main reason for admitting Karla in Prime Hospital was her chronic problem of type 2 diabetes that needed immediate attention medical healthcare professionals (Lim et al., 2019) 

The problem with nurses in Prime Hospital is that nurses at the time of admission of the patient had possible shortfalls and drawbacks. These weaknesses in the skills of nurses did not help the patient who wanted adequate and up to data guidance from them to achieve the best outcomes. For example, it was discovered that the nurses did not have the right education and mentoring skills in addition to having the best knowledge of type 2 diabetes treatment and dietary precautions. This weakness became the reason for nurses who failed to demonstrate Karla effective self-management of diabetes for solving her health issue. The nurses were unable to suggest the most appropriate diet to Karla during her stay in the hospital. Moreover, they were also supposed to advise the patient about the use of insulin whether she was at home or at the hospital (Lawler, 2019). However, the patient showed signs of increased hypertension, anxiety, and low blood pressures that showed weaknesses of nurses to provide her the best interventions. Fortunately, the nurses including myself were told about our weaknesses and shortcomings o help the patient get more education about their diabetic condition and how Karla can use the information from patient education using the evidence-based approach to directly manage her disease (Lawler, 2019). 

NURS FPX 4900 Assessment 1 Assessing the Problem: Leadership Collaboration Communication Change Management and Policy Considerations SC

Evidence-Based Approach Used 

The problem discussed here is extremely important for baccalaureate-prepared nurses in Prime Hospital because it affects their outcomes of providing the best care to the patients of type 2 diabetes to save them from a possible stroke or a heart attack.  In the practicum session, the excising condition of Karla was evidence through a set of questions asked from her for about two hours. The fact remains the evidence-based practices help to identify and apply the safest healthcare procedures and strategies. For example, a research published by    Lall (2019) states that eat more low glycolic diet in the case of Karla was unsuitable for her current diabetic condition because it contained high level of fat and oil and Karla was already not consuming these diets well (Mogre, 2015). Moreover, the research states that the guidelines of the ADA can serve as a set of rules nurses should follow to successful treat the patients of type 2 diabetes that is usually less common in females compared to males. This requires nurses at Prime Hospital to arrange educational sessions for such patients to manage their cholesterol levels appropriately. 

More researchers have explained the issues of type2 diabetes and their multidisciplinary interventions such as meditations, using insulin pumps, and maintaining a risk-free lifestyle and routine (Kutz, et al., 2018). He American Diabetes Association (ADA) has already provides some vital guidelines to the professionals to decrease the level of serum glycolic in diabetic patients. This knowledge can be sufficiently good for nurses in our hospital if they treat a patient with a combination of hypertension with heart issues. These recommendations are also necessary for Karla who is a diabetic, hypertension, and heart patient and needs major lifestyle and attitude changes in her daily routines to improve her changes of having a long life. This means that nurses are mentors who can provide this type of information to Karla and help her in her care management with evidence-based practices and the right knowledge of interventions (Ojo, 2016)

The best thing about the ADA is that it strongly emphasizes the knowledge-increase in nurses to help patients archive the stronger positive outcomes (Powell, 2015). The ADA’s recommendations can be used as industry’s best standards in the 21st century to deal with complex healthcare issues and patients such as type 2 diabetes and Karla respectively. These are the national standards that every hospital should respect and utilize to provide good community care services (Kent et al.,2013). In the perspective of helping nurses, the ADA rules and guidelines will serve as the best standards to ensure training sessions of nurses regarding learning these standards and improve their skills and knowledge in the current settings. This education and training is vital to obtain for nurses who can significantly increase their knowledge about insulin delivery, type 2 diabetes symptoms, glycolic targets, and how to educate patients (Power et al., 2021). For example, researchers believe that the control and knowledge of glycolic targets is vital for all nurses because it is a mandatory element to consider in the treatment of diabetes. This means that learning and training patients more about glycolic issues and targets, nurses can enhance the life-quality of patients such as Karla (Kennedy, 2019). 

Barriers to Implementation of Evidence-based Practices 

The two-hour practicum session was very beneficial because it helped to understand and identify the barriers to implementation of evidence-based practices. The most commonly reported and observed barriers or weaknesses in nursing were the frequency of diabetic education provision and the use of right technology tools. For example, the analysis of barriers revealed that nurses in Prime Hospital needed some proper training and education related to knowing significantly about diabetes type 2 disease and interventions (Sorensen et al., 2020). This was a great barrier that acts as an obstacle in the delivery of the best interventions. Moreover, some DSN nurses more commonly specialized in diabetes were also not in vast majority in the healthcare organization. This was a huge issue because this increases workload of the existing nurses and other doctors at duty who feel agitated and burnout (Kantanen, 2017). This also adversely impacts they overall collaboration and communication in the night shift to treat diabetic and heart patients effectively. Unfortunately, the nurses were showing resistance or lack of motivation to receive diabetic training to enhance their knowledge which served as a hindrance or barrier to apply and use the evidence-based practices effectively. 

NURS FPX 4900 Assessment 1 Assessing the Problem: Leadership Collaboration Communication Change Management and Policy Considerations SC

Nursing and National Standards/Organisational based Policies and Guidelines in Improving Patient

Undoubtedly, more educated and informed nurses will contribute effectively towards treating diabetic patients like Karla well. If she further feels symptoms of stroke, I will be a result of her poor patient education and lifestyle (Humbles, 2017). Therefore, the ADA has provided standards for the self-management of diabetes that help nurses to apply special regulations to treat diabetes. It involves applying regulations in improve patients’ diet, exercise, insulin intake, and their other physical activities such as yoga (Cronshaw, 2021). The standard also emphasizes on insulin education and training so that nurses can resiliently utilize insulin without any negligence (Sugiharto, 2017). Moreover, another vital body for diabetes standard is the National Diabetes Prevention Program that offers great research related to diabetes and also helps the nurses in Prime Hospital to gain adequate training related to using tools for preventing type 2 diabetes (Chamberlain et al., 2018). Finally, the Affordable Care Act of the United States (ADA) also ensures that poor patients get the vital medical insurance to improve their health. The ADA also guides nurses regarding psychological issues of diabetic patients. Researchers have tested the effectiveness of these standards and claim that using these standards can be ground-breaking for the professional expertise of nurses (Ueki, 2017). 

Role of Nurses in Policy Making 

The best healthcare organizations are helping nurses to involve in leadership practices to form effective healthcare policy. There is a need to promote the widespread education and training of nurses regarding policy-making so they can become strong leaders and voice their reasons (Bramley, 2018). Researchers like Cavender (2015) argue that registered and qualified nurses should take more part in decision-making and policy-building. These strategies can be enhancing through policy education programs (Van Hecke, 2019). 

 Nursing Theory 

King’s Theory for Goal Attainment is vital for nurses to enhance and boost their performances regarding effective diabetes patient care. For example, the research conducted by Bokhour (2018) used a quasi-experiment that took a sample of 60 diabetic patients. While studying the interventions, the improvement in many aspects of disease was found due to strict adherence of patients to these goals. This means that the Theory of Goals Attainment is vital for nurses to improve their education and achieve the best patient care goals for treating type 2 diabetes. The above-mentioned theories and standards can play a pivotal role in improving the patient care outcomes related to Karla who was a type 2 diabetic patient (Velmurugan, 2017).

Leadership Strategies to Improve Outcomes for the Chosen Patient

Nowadays, healthcare managers should learn skills to become effective leaders because managers cannot create a vision of form high-performing teams despite their ability to organize and plan (Alqatawenh, 2018). This shows that researchers significantly emphasize nurses and professionals to learn patient-cantered collaborative leadership skills which can increase their overall impact on the organization and help them to become change agents and visionaries. Since nurses failed to provide Karla adequate guidance related to type 2 diabetes, this showed their lack of leadership and motivational skills to educate patient. This implies that leadership skills can help our nurses at Prime Hospital to manage the glycolic more and improve interdisciplinary communication (Wigert, 2014). The most vital leadership skill is to learn to enhance patient-nurse communication. Moreover, leadership in nurses will allow them to provide timely and patient-focused health services. Leadership skills can be enhanced by educational sessions and professional trainings conducted by the hospital (“Affordable care act”, 2020). Nurses can learn from their senior leaders as well to adopt their behaviours. Since leaders are rational than emotional, emotional intelligence skills of nurses can enhance through leadership to solve the particular issues of Karla in the emergency ward. 

NURS FPX 4900 Assessment 1 Assessing the Problem: Leadership Collaboration Communication Change Management and Policy Considerations SC

Change management is vital for healthcare professionals in our settings to develop the best interventions and strategies to handle type 2 diabetes patients and situations that require doing things resiliently. Change can be brought in the organizational culture that can enhance teamwork and collaboration among nurses.     By using these resources, evidence-based approaches, and theories in addition to leadership and change management, nurses in Prime Hospital can incorporate safe and long-term practices. This means that change management can help to solve the weaknesses problems in nurses and allow decision-makers to take notice of every positive and negative event in the company (Adu, et al., 2019).  

References 

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NURS FPX 4900 Assessment 1 Assessing the Problem: Leadership Collaboration Communication Change Management and Policy Considerations SC

Kantanen, K., Kaunonen, M., Helminen, M., & Suominen, T. (2017). Leadership and management competencies of head nurses and directors of nursing in Finnish social and health care. Journal of Research in Nursing22(3), 228-244.

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