NURS FPX 4010 Assessment 1 Interview and Interdisciplinary Issue Identification NB

NURS FPX 4010 Assessment 1 Interview and Interdisciplinary Issue Identification NB

Interview and Interdisciplinary Issue Identification

Interview and Interdisciplinary Issue Identification

An interdisciplinary approach entails health experts from several disciplines, as well as the patient, working together as a team. The most effective teams share duties and encourage role interdependence while respecting the experience and individuality of individual members. It entails utilizing numerous disciplines (or independent areas of learning or domains of competence) to reframe issues outside of usual limits and arrive at solutions based on a fresh understanding of difficult situations. It prevents care fragmentation. A multidisciplinary approach to care does not increase care efficiency, reduce the number of caregivers, or shorten hospital stays (Harris et al., 2019). 

Interview Summary 

I conducted an interview of a colleague, Jessica, who works as a charge nurse in the emergency department of the same organization where I work as a baccalaureate nurse. Her duty includes assigning patients to physicians and assisting them in giving treatment to patients. Almost always, when patients are being cared for, the ER is overcrowded. It is the most serious problem in the hospital’s emergency department, and it must be addressed. She stated in her interview with me that it would be beneficial from my perspective as a baccalaureate nurse to address this issue with her and how we can overcome it by including all stakeholders and using an interdisciplinary approach. When the identified need for emergency services exceeds available resources for patient treatment in the emergency department (ED), hospital, or both, crowding occurs (Peng et al., 2020). Crowding is caused by a variety of factors that span the whole health-care delivery system. Overcrowding in emergency departments (EDs) is a multifaceted problem that occurs as a result of extended LOS in the ED, insufficient healthcare professional appointments, delayed response to ED consultations, frequent ED visits (including improper usage), and hospital-specific variables (Harris et al., 2019). Various studies have created definitions of ED overcrowding, but in its most basic form, overcrowding arises when there is insufficient capacity to satisfy the timely demands of the next patient in need of emergency treatment. Overcrowding occurs when the treatment of critical problems is delayed due to traffic (Salway et al., 2017). Overcrowding or emergency ‘access block’ is caused by legitimate demand for emergency admission from patients (especially the elderly) who can only be treated in hospitals: Overcrowding happens when hospitals exceed the acceptable limit of 85 percent bed occupancy and more people require unexpected admission than there are available beds (Morley& Cashell, 2017). 

NURS FPX 4010 Assessment 1 Interview and Interdisciplinary Issue Identification NB

Identification of the issue

Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) causes issues for both patients and staff, such as longer wait times, higher ambulance diversion, increased length of stay, increased medical mistakes, increased patient mortality, and greater harm to hospitals owing to financial losses. Overcrowding in the ED manifests as: (1) “boarding” of patients in the ED; (2) increased risk of medical mistakes; (3) ambulance diversion; (4) danger to disaster readiness; and (5) decreasing trustworthiness of the emergency care system.” Prolonged duration of stay in the ED, delayed laboratory and imaging tests, delay of consultants, and a lack of appropriate inpatient beds are the most common reasons of congestion in the ED, as they are in other areas of the globe (Harris et al., 2019).

Overcrowding can have an impact on a patient’s symptoms, clinical result, and satisfaction. It can also have an impact on physician effectiveness, leading to discontent among medical personnel. It may possibly contribute toward violence. Solving this problem will need a collaborative effort on the part of management, doctors, and society as a whole (Salway et al., 2017).

NURS FPX 4010 Assessment 1 Interview and Interdisciplinary Issue Identification NB

Change Theories That Could Lead to an Interdisciplinary Solution

Change models in healthcare give a road map for change as well as a framework for overcoming change barriers. Change models may also assist with methods for achieving change in healthcare by utilizing tried-and-true approaches based on human behavior. Theory of Change is a planning, participation, and assessment process used to create social change in businesses, charity, not-for-profit organizations, and government agencies. Theory of Change identifies long-term goals before mapping backward to find required preconditions. The most relevant theory to apply in the multidisciplinary solution is Lewin’s three-step model (Morley & Cashell, 2017). Kurt Lewin, known as the “Father of Social Psychology,” established the Change Theory of Nursing. In this concept, behavior is defined as “a dynamic balance of forces acting in opposing directions” by Lewin. There are three primary principles in the Change Theory: driving forces, restraining forces, and equilibrium. According to Lewin, the process of change comprises first developing the notion that a change is required, then progressing toward the desired level of conduct, and lastly cementing that new behavior as the norm (Salway et al., 2017). 

NURS FPX 4010 Assessment 1 Interview and Interdisciplinary Issue Identification NB

Lewin’s theory may help nurses overcome resistance and adopt new technology by providing a greater knowledge of how change impacts the organization, identifying hurdles to effective implementation, and recognizing opposing forces that work on human behavior throughout change. Understanding the science of change theory is essential for changing organizational structures. Understanding different change theories can give a foundation for implementing, managing, and assessing change in the context of human behavior (Giuliante et al., 2018).

Leadership Strategies That Could Lead to an Interdisciplinary Solution

Healthcare executives must manage staff engagement proactively by focusing on recognized engagement factors such as executive actions, quality of care, advancement possibilities, stress management, communication, and recognition. Self-awareness, vision, self-regulation, motivation, decisiveness, integrity, interpersonal communication skills, strategic planning, team building, innovation, and being an effective change agent were recognized as transdisciplinary leadership competencies. Some of the main strategies of lea are designing and developing plan evidence-based exercise, demographically appropriate healthcare, health care decision, risk preparation, transparency for assessment and improvement of point-of-care consequences, customer and organizational fairness, representatives and supervisory of care delivery and outcomes, organizational skills and collaborative effort with other healthcare professional teammates, and resource development and leveraging.

Collaboration Approaches for Interdisciplinary Teams

Teamwork. An interdisciplinary approach entails health experts from several disciplines, as well as the patient, working together as a team. The most effective teams share duties and encourage role interdependence while respecting the experience and individuality of individual members. Support social contact through small gatherings, team building activities, celebrating team successes, breaking down office silos with open plan work areas, having leadership encourage open communication and innovation, and using technological platforms are all interprofessional cooperation techniques. A doctor, nurse, physical therapist, occupational therapist, and pharmacist working together to carry out a personalized plan of treatment to enhance a patient’s health condition is an example of interprofessional cooperation (Morley & Cashell, 2017). Collaboration among physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals raises team members’ awareness of each other’s knowledge and abilities, resulting in ongoing decision-making improvement.

References 

Brassler, M., & Dettmers, J. (2017). How to enhance interdisciplinary competence—interdisciplinary problem-based learning versus interdisciplinary project-based learning. Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning11(2), 12.

Giuliante, M. M., Greenberg, S. A., McDonald, M. V., Squires, A., Moore, R., & Cortes, T. A. (2018). Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training 2.0: A collaborative team-based approach to delivering care. Journal of interprofessional care, 32(5), 629-633.

NURS FPX 4010 Assessment 1 Interview and Interdisciplinary Issue Identification NB

Harris, M. B., Rafeedie, S., McArthur, D., Babikian, T., Snyder, A., Polster, D., & Giza, C. C. (2019). Addition of occupational therapy to an interdisciplinary concussion clinic improves identification of functional impairments. The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation, 34(6), 425-432.

Morley, L., & Cashell, A. (2017). Collaboration in health care. Journal of medical imaging and radiation sciences, 48(2), 207-216.

Peng, Q., Yang, J., Strome, T., Weldon, E., & Chochinov, A. (2020). Evaluation of physician in triage impact on overcrowding in emergency department using discrete-event simulation. Journal of Project Management, 5(4), 211-226.

Schad, J., & Miron-Spektor, E. (2021). Lewis, Marianne W.: Paradoxes of change and changing through paradox. Springer Books, 951-965.

Salway, R. J., Valenzuela, R., Shoenberger, J. M., Mallon, W. K., & Viccellio, A. (2017). Emergency department (ED) overcrowding: evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions. Revista Médica Clínica Las Condes28(2), 213-219.

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