Writink Services

In this assessment, a quantitative research question will be formulated, and a hypothesis for managing pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients. Several quantitative research methodologies will be discussed. The rationale and relevance of selected strategies will be explained along with data collection tools. Additionally, to collect in-depth information to prevent pressure ulcers, data from various stakeholders will be collected, such as patients with pressure ulcers, care providers, and other administrative personnel. Quantitative research aims to evaluate a hypothesis or provide research questions by gathering and analyzing numerical data. This method typically involves structured data collection techniques, such as surveys, experiments, or observations, and uses statistical methods to analyze and interpret the data (Bloomfield & Fisher, 2019).

Quantitative Research Question Associated with Hypothesis

Research Question 

What are the most effective preventative methods for pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients and their risk factors? Based on the formulated research question, an underlying hypothesis is developed below:

Null Hypothesis 

There is no causal connection between pressure ulcer risk factors and treatment options in hospitalized patients.

Alternative Hypothesis

In hospitalized patients, a causal connection exists between pressure ulcer risk factors and treatment options. This indicates that implementing preventative measures can lessen the likelihood of individuals developing pressure ulcers who are elderly, immobile, have poor nutrition, and have incontinence.

Providing Specific Example

According to research, 53,000 patients were studied, and the rate of pressure ulcers acquired during hospital stays was 0.98 cases per 1,000 days (Kim et al., 2019). Age, gender, previous falls, low oxygen levels, posture, and bathroom use are all risk factors for pressure ulcer formation. Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers are also possible (Kim et al., 2019).

Pressure ulcers affect approximately 3 million adults nationwide annually and can be prevented in most cases (Mervis & Phillips, 2019). Risk factors that can make people more likely to get pressure ulcers include being immobile, eating unhealthy food, having bladder or bowel control problems, age factors like aging, being very overweight, or having other medical conditions like diabetes or heart disease (Mervis & Phillips, 2019).

Quantitative Research Methodologies

Quantitative research methodologies refer to the various techniques and approaches used to conduct quantitative research (Adedoyin, 2020). Here are some commonly used methodologies:

Surveys Research 

A survey is a structured questionnaire that is administered to a sample of respondents to collect data. A survey could gather information on patient demographics, risk factors for pressure ulcer development, and attitudes toward treatment interventions. The survey questions would be carefully designed to ensure they are clear and unbiased. The data collected through the survey will be analyzed using statistical methods to identify patterns and draw conclusions about the risk factors for hospitalized patients (Adedoyin, 2020).

Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT)

RCT is a quantitative research methodology that randomly assigns patients with pressure ulcers to different prevention or treatment interventions to assess their effectiveness in healing pressure ulcers. In an RCT, patients are randomly allocated to one or more groups receiving a specific standard preventive intervention. An RCT aims to compare the outcomes between the treatment and control groups and determine if the intervention significantly impacts pressure ulcer prevention or healing (Bhide et al., 2018).

A Case-Control Study 

To discover potential risk factors for developing pressure ulcers, this quantitative research technique compares patients with pressure ulcers versus those without. In a case-control study, researchers select a group of patients with pressure ulcers and compare them to a control group without them. The two groups are then compared to identify risk factors for pressure ulcer development, such as age, mobility, nutritional status, and medical history (Dupépé et al., 2018). 

Retrospective Chart Review 

It is a quantitative research methodology examining medical records of hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers. In a retrospective chart review, researchers collect data from patient records that have already been completed. This study design is useful for identifying factors associated with pressure ulcer development. It can be used for evaluating the effectiveness of treatment interventions. Retrospective chart reviews can be less expensive and time-consuming (Artico et al., 2018).

Each methodology has its strengths and weaknesses, and the choice of methodology depends on the research question, the nature of the research problem, and the available resources.

The Rationale for Proposed Methodologies

The above-mentioned quantitative research methodologies have been selected for their ability to provide reliable and objective data on pressure ulcer prevention and treatment (Adedoyin, 2020). Surveys are an efficient method for collecting large amounts of data from a diverse population, while RCTs provide rigorous evidence of the effectiveness of interventions. Case-control studies and retrospective chart reviews are useful for identifying risk factors and evaluating the effectiveness of treatment interventions (Dupépé et al., 2018). Each methodology has its strengths and limitations, and selecting the appropriate methodology depends on the research question, the study design, and the available resources. 

Data Collection Tools and Strategies

Well-Structured Questionnaire 

Quantitative data is gathered using a well-structured questionnaire that includes clear and objective questions. The questions are designed to collect specific information from the respondents, and the responses are tallied to generate numerical data (Yaddanapudi & Yaddanapudi, 2019). Quantitative data is useful for testing hypotheses, identifying patterns, and drawing conclusions about a population. However, it is important to ensure that the questionnaire is carefully designed. The data collected is representative of the population being studied to ensure the reliability of the results (Yaddanapudi & Yaddanapudi, 2019).

Interview Method 

Interviews can be used in quantitative research to collect data from participants. In quantitative research, interviews are typically structured or semi-structured, meaning that the questions are predetermined and standardized to ensure that the same questions are posed in the same manner to each participant. This allows for the data to be analyzed using statistical methods. Interviews can be useful in quantitative research for collecting data on specific topics and in-depth insights into individual experiences (Rutakumwa et al., 2019). 

Surveys or Questionnaires 

Surveys and questionnaires are widely used quantitative research methods for collecting data from many participants. The questions in a survey are typically standardized and structured to ensure that all participants are asked the same questions in the same way. They can also be used to measure the effectiveness of interventions or programs. Surveys can provide numerical data that is simple to analyze using statistical methods and are a cost-effective and efficient approach to gathering information from many participants. (Taherdoost, 2019).

Close-ended Questions 

Questionnaires that use close-ended questions can be useful in quantitative research for gathering data on attitudes, behaviors, and demographics. The questions are typically structured and standardized to ensure that all participants are asked the same questions in the same way, making it easier to compare and analyze responses across participants. Close-ended questions can also be useful for measuring the effectiveness of interventions or programs (Chen et al., 2019).

All the identified data collection tools or strategies are relevant to the research question of identifying risk factors and effective prevention measures for pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients. A well-structured questionnaire can collect numerical data on specific risk factors and prevention measures. Interviews can provide in-depth insights into participants’ experiences with pressure ulcers (Gill & Baillie, 2018). You can use surveys or questionnaires to gather information from many people, making it easier to identify patterns and draw conclusions about risk factors and prevention measures. Close-ended questions can gather numerical data on attitudes and behaviors related to pressure ulcer prevention, making it easier to compare and analyze responses across participants (Chen et al., 2019). By utilizing these quantitative data collection tools and strategies, researchers can gather rich data that can be analyzed using statistical methods. This data can be used to conclude risk factors and effective prevention measures for pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients (McLeod, 2023).

Importance of Targeted Data Collection to Research Plan

Targeted data collection is essential in quantitative research, particularly in answering the proposed research questions. What are the most effective preventative methods for pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients and their risk factors? Targeted data collection is critical to quantitative research, especially when studying complex issues such as risk factors and prevention measures for pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients. By targeting specific data collection methods, researchers can gather precise and relevant information that can be analyzed using statistical methods to draw valid conclusions (Morris et al., 2019).

Researchers can use a well-structured questionnaire to ask direct and objective questions about pressure ulcers, such as patient’s medical history, age, mobility status, and skin integrity. By gathering this information, researchers can identify potential risk factors that increase the likelihood of pressure ulcers developing in hospitalized patients (Yaddanapudi & Yaddanapudi, 2019).

Additionally, interviews can provide in-depth insights into patients’ experiences and perspectives, allowing researchers to gather quantitative data that can complement quantitative data. Surveys or questionnaires can also gather data from many patients, providing statistical data that can be analyzed to identify trends and patterns (Kelley, Q, 2018).

Close-ended questions can provide numerical data that can be analyzed using statistical methods, and interviews can provide in-depth insights into participants’ experiences with pressure ulcers. By using targeted data collection methods, researchers can ensure that the data collected is directly relevant to the research question, increasing the validity and reliability of the results (Vraga et al., 2019).

Potential Challenges

While targeted data collection is important for any research project, potential challenges may arise, especially in quantitative research. One of the main challenges is ensuring that the sample represents the population being studied. This requires careful consideration of the sampling technique and size to avoid selection bias (Sim & Waterfield, 2019). Another challenge is the potential for response bias, where participants may need to answer questions accurately, leading to inaccurate data. In addition, data collection methods may be subject to measurement errors, such as errors in recording or data entry (Noury et al., 2018).

Conclusion BHA FPX 4010 Assessment 3 Qualitative Research Questions and Methods

The research question is about identifying the most effective preventative methods for pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients and their risk factors. The null hypothesis states that no causal connection exists between pressure ulcer risk factors and treatment options in hospitalized patients. In contrast, the alternative hypothesis indicates a causal connection between the two. The chosen quantitative research methodologies are surveys, randomized controlled trials, case-control studies, and retrospective chart reviews, each with strengths. Data collection tools include well-structured questionnaires and interviews, which generate numerical data that can be analyzed using statistical methods. The selection of the appropriate methodology and data collection tools depends on the research question and available resources.

References

Adedoyin, O. B. (2020, April). Quantitative research method. Researchgate.net. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/340594619_Quantitative_Research_Method 

Artico, M., Dante, A., D’Angelo, D., Lamarca, L., Mastroianni, C., Petitti, T., Piredda, M., & De Marinis, M. G. (2018). Prevalence, incidence and associated factors of pressure ulcers in-home palliative care patients: A retrospective chart review. Palliative Medicine32(1), 299–307. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269216317737671 

Bhide, A., Shah, P. S., & Acharya, G. (2018). A simplified guide to randomized controlled trials. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica97(4), 380–387. https://doi.org/10.1111/aogs.13309 

Bloomfield, J., & Fisher, M. (2019). Quantitative research design. Journal of the Australasian Rehabilitation Nurses’ Association22(2), 27–30. 

https://doi.org/10.33235/jarna.22.2.27-30

Chen, A.-H., Bakar, N.-F. A., & Lam, C. S.-Y. (2019). Comparison of open-ended and close-ended questions to determine signs and symptoms of eye problems among children. Journal of Optometry13(2). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.optom.2019.07.002 

Dupépé, E. B., Kicielinski, K. P., Gordon, A. S., & Walters, B. C. (2018). What is a case-control study? Neurosurgery84(4), 819–826. https://doi.org/10.1093/neuros/nyy590 

Gill, P., & Baillie, J. (2018). Interviews and focus groups in qualitative research: An update for the digital age. British Dental Journal225(7), 668–672. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.815 

Kelley, Q, L. I. (2018). Surveys: Merging qualitative and quantitative research methods. Seminars in Pediatric Surgery27(6), 361–366. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.sempedsurg.2018.10.007 

Kim, J., Lee, J., & Lee, E. (2019). Risk factors for newly acquired pressure ulcer and the impact of nurse staffing on pressure ulcer incidence. Journal of Nursing Management30(5). https://doi.org/10.1111/jonm.12928 

McLeod, S. (2023, April 6). What’s the difference between qualitative and quantitative research? Simplypsychology.org. https://www.simplypsychology.org/qualitative-quantitative.html 

Mervis, J. S., & Phillips, T. J. (2019). Pressure ulcers: Pathophysiology, epidemiology, risk factors, and presentation. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

81(4), 881–890. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2018.12.069 

Morris, T. P., White, I. R., & Crowther, M. J. (2019). Using simulation studies to evaluate statistical methods. Statistics in Medicine38(11), 2074–2102. https://doi.org/10.1002/sim.8086 

Noury, N., Picard, R., Billebot, M.-N., Salmon, F. D., Lewkowicz, M., & Noat, H. (2018). Challenges and limitations of data capture versus data entry. Connected Healthcare for the Citizen, 85–97. https://doi.org/10.1016/b978-1-78548-298-4.50007-5 

Rutakumwa, R., Mugisha, J. O., Bernays, S., Kabunga, E., Tumwekwase, G., Mbonye, M., & Seeley, J. (2019). Conducting in-depth interviews with and without voice recorders: A comparative analysis. Qualitative Research20(5), 146879411988480. https://doi.org/10.1177/1468794119884806 

Sim, J., & Waterfield, J. (2019). Focus group methodology: Some ethical challenges. Quality & Quantity53(6), 3003–3022. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11135-019-00914-5 

Taherdoost, H. (2019, March 29). What is the best response scale for survey and questionnaire design; review of different lengths of rating scale/attitude scale/Likert Scale. Papers.ssrn.com. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3588604 

Vraga, E. K., Bode, L., Smithson, A. B., & Renfree, S. R. (2019). Accidentally attentive: Comparing visual, close-ended, and open-ended measures of attention on social media. Computers in Human Behavior99, 235–244. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2019.05.017 

Yaddanapudi, S., & Yaddanapudi, L. (2019). How to design a questionnaire? Indian Journal of Anaesthesia63(5), 335. https://doi.org/10.4103/ija.ija_334_19 

Leave a Reply

Please Fill The Following to Resume Reading


    Please Enter Active Contact Information For OTP





    Verification is necessary to avoid bots.

    ×